• Increased robot use, fuelled by price declines and the increased dexterity of these machines, is expected to affect existing/future production technologies and the organisation of production within global value chains. As many economies are implementing policies to support use of industrial robotics, this new working paper investigates how production may be affected via changes in offshoring and backshoring.

  • In 2017, 30 out of 35 OECD member countries and a number of other major economies gave preferential tax treatment to R&D. See our newly updated R&D tax incentive profiles available for 25 countries as well as the latest indicators and information on the cost, design and scope of R&D tax incentives.

  • The latest OECD data on R&D for 2016 show China on course to match OECD average R&D intensity by 2020. Find out more and download highlights from the recent update.

  • New digital tools are empowering, and can serve to support a new source of inclusive global economic growth. To seize this opportunity it is essential that no one, and especially no woman, is held back in trying to achieve their aspirations. Now is the time to ensure the digital transformation represents a leapfrog opportunity for women and a chance to build a more inclusive digital world. This brochure, prepared with the support of the Australian Government and launched in New York at the margin of the 62nd session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women, presents preliminary analysis and experimental indicators to help broaden the evidence base.

  • Between now and 2030, innovations such as 3D printers, robotics, new materials and data-led manufacturing will have fascinating implications for production. The more governments and firms understand, the better placed they will be to address the risks and reap the benefits.

    On 6 February,  Alistair Nolan from @OECDinnovation was at the American Library in Paris to discuss the OECD report The Next Production Revolution: Implications for Governments and Business

    •    Watch the replay on Facebook
    •    See the report

  • Agreement on a harmonised application of clear statistical definitions of technologies is pertinent to the delineation of technology fields both with regard to each other and within the context of wider economic developments.

    This document revises the OECD's statistical definition of biotechnology and proposes the adoption of a statistical definition of nanotechnology in the same format.

    See also: 

  • This paper uses “centrality” metrics to reflect position within global value chains. Central sectors reflect those that are highly connected (both directly and indirectly) and influential within global production networks, whereas peripheral sectors exhibit weak linkages and are less influential. Applying these metrics to OECD ICIO data reveals that there have been profound changes in the structure of GVCs over the period 1995-2011. 

  • What are the recent policy and technology approaches to bridging the digital divide in rural and remote areas in OECD countries? Experience in OECD countries with fibre optics, coaxial cable, copper, fixed and mobile wireless, satellites and hybrid approaches, as well as with emerging technologies, are used to illustrate some of the technological trends discussed in this paper. It also includes a summary of common challenges and good practices to bring improved communication services to individuals and communities in rural and remote regions.

  • Published last October, the Digital Economy Outlook looks at policy implications of the digital transformation and shows how Internet infrastructure and usage vary across countries and firms in the OECD area.

    A summary is also available in 26 languages at:

  • Released in November, the STI Scoreboard 2017 draws on the latest internationally comparable data to show how the digital transformation affects science, innovation, the economy and the way people work and live.

    A summary is also available in 26 languages at: